Some car accidents in New Hampshire can be so serious that those involved fracture their femur bones. This is especially a possibility if the accident involved a pedestrian or motorcyclist although much depends on the height and angle of the car that struck them. Femur fractures arise from car crashes more than from any other event according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Different kinds of femur fractures

Fractures can be complete or partial. The latter may be stress fractures, usually to the femoral neck, that the elderly incur when they fall. Complete fractures, in particular fractures of the femoral shaft or the distal end, which attaches to the knee joint, are more frequently reported in high-impact car crashes. Sometimes, victims may have the bone crushed, resulting in splintering.

How life-threatening can these fractures be?

While the fracture itself may not be life-threatening, the complications that arise from it can be. The force of impact may cause victims’ blood vessels to rupture and their muscles and ligaments to be torn. Blood loss and blood clots can be the result. If the bone pierces the skin and comes out, victims run a high risk for infection, too.

How femur fractures are treated

In the case of a complete fracture, doctors may make use of metal rods, plates, wires and screws to reattach the pieces and realign the bone. If infection seems possible, patients may receive antibiotics intravenously and continue taking antibiotics in an oral form. They may need to undergo physical therapy and rehabilitative care before a full recovery. Pain medications may be prescribed as well.

When accident victims were not at fault

Victims of motor vehicle accidents may file third-party insurance claims since New Hampshire is an at-fault state. If victims are partially to blame, then whatever amount in they recover in damages will be reduced proportioned to their fault.

To see how strong of a case you have, you may want to see a personal injury lawyer. The lawyer may handle the negotiations and other procedures while you continue to focus on your physical recovery.